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Ocean/Atmosphere Circulation Modeling Projects

There is information available via the WWW about quite a few ocean circulation modeling projects, including in some cases the source code for the models themselves. Here's a list of the ones I know of, a brief description of the site, and information as to the availability of the model. The models range from primitive equation to quasi-geostrophic, from level to layer, from regional to global, from single- to multi-processor, and from well- to poorly-documented. The usual warnings about blindly using black-box codes apply and, to the contrary, most if not all of these codes will reward careful study if you care to learn about the gory details of implementing, for example, layer or spectral models. You also might want to send a brief note to the programmer expressing your eternal gratitude. Enjoy, eh?


ACADIA
ACOM
BatTri
BOM
BRIOS
DROG3D
CLIO
COHERENS
DieCAST
ECBILT
ECOM-si
ELCIRC
FLAME
FMS
FRAM
FUNDY
GMODEL
GOTM
HIM
HOPE
HYCOM
LOAM
LSM
MICOM
MITgcm
MOM
MOMA
NCOM
NLOM
NUBBLE
OCCAM
OCCOMM
OPA
OSMOM
PEQMOD
POCM
POM
POP
Poseidon
POSUM
QTCM
QUODDY
ROMS
SCRUM
SEA
SELFE
SEOM
SPEM
TOMS



Sea Ice Models


CSIM

CSIM4 is the sea ice component of CCSM2 that includes an elastic-viscous-plastic (EVP) dynamics scheme, an ice thickness distribution, energy-conserving thermodynamics, a slab ocean mixed layer model, and the ability to run using prescribed ice concentrations. It is supported on high and low-resolution Greenland Pole grids, which are identical to those used by the Parallel Ocean Program (POP) ocean model. The high resolution version is best suited for simulating present-day and future climate scenarios while the low resolution option is used for paleoclimate simulations.

[http://www.ccsm.ucar.edu/models/ccsm2.0/csim/]

CICE

The Los Alamos sea ice model (CICE) is the result of an effort to develop a computationally efficient sea ice component for a fully coupled atmosphere-ice-ocean-land global climate model. It was designed to be compatible with the Parallel Ocean Program (POP), an ocean circulation model developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory for use on massively parallel computers . The current version of the model has been enhanced greatly through collaborations with members of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) Polar Climate Working Group, based at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR).

CICE has several interacting components: a thermodynamic model that computes local growth rates of snow and ice due to vertical conductive fluxes, snowfall and local temperatures; a model of ice dynamics, which predicts the velocity field of the ice pack based on a model of the material strength of the ice; a transport model that describes advection of the areal concentration, ice volumes and other state variables; and a ridging parameterization that transfers ice among thickness categories based on energetic balances and rates of strain. Additional routines prepare and execute data exchanges with an external "flux coupler," which then passes the data to other climate model components such as POP.

[http://climate.lanl.gov/Models/CICE/]

MI-IM (Meteorological Institute Ice Model)

A new state-of-art dynamic-thermodynamic sea ice model, the Meteorological Institute's Ice Model (MI-IM), has been developed based on the elastic-viscous-plastic (EVP) dynamics of Hunke and Dukowicz and the thermodynamics of Mellor and Kantha.

[http://www.met.no/english/r_and_d_activities/method/num_mod/ocean_mod/mi_im.html]

SHEBA

A single column ice thickness distribution model.

[http://curry.eas.gatech.edu/SHEBA/singcolmod.html]


Surface Wave and Nearshore Circulation Models


FUNWAVE

FUNWAVE is a phase-resolving, time-stepping Boussinesq model for ocean surface wave propagation in the nearshore.

[http://chinacat.coastal.udel.edu/~kirby/programs/funwave/funwave.html]

Java Applets for Coastal Engineering

[http://coastal.udel.edu/faculty/rad/]

NearCoM

An extensible, user-configurable model system for nearshore wave, circulation and sediment processes.

[ http://chinacat.coastal.udel.edu/~kirby/programs/nearcom/index.html]

REF/DIF

REF/DIF is a phase-resolving parabolic refraction-diffraction model for ocean surface wave propagation.

[http://chinacat.coastal.udel.edu/~kirby/programs/refdif/refdif.html]

SHORECIRC

SHORECIRC is a quasi-3D model, which combines the effects of vertical structure of the currents with the simplicity of a 2D-horizontal model for nearshore circulation. This is done by using an analytical solution for the depth-integrated 2D horizontal equations.

The SHORECIRC model system consists of two parts:

The model predicts the motion in the time domain and hence is in principle capable of describing the effect of random wave motions.

[http://chinacat.coastal.udel.edu/~kirby/programs/shorecirc/shorecirc.html]

SWAN (Simulating Waves Nearshore)

[ http://vlm089.citg.tudelft.nl/swan/index.htm]

[http://fluidmechanics.tudelft.nl/swan/default.htm]

WAVEWATCH

WAVEWATCH III is a third generation wave model developed at NOAA/NCEP in the spirit of the WAM model. It is a further development of the model WAVEWATCH I, as developed at Delft University of Technology and WAVEWATCH II, developed at NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center. It nevertheless differs from its predecessors on all important points; the governing equations, the models structure, numerical methods and physical parameterizations.

WAVEWATCH III solves the spectral action density balance equation for wavenumber-direction spectra. The implicit assumption of these equations is that the medium (depth and current) as well as the wave field vary on time and space scales that are much larger than the corresponding scales of a single wave. Furthermore, the physics included in the model do not cover conditions where the waves are severely depth-limited. This implies that the model can generally by applied on spatial scales (grid increments) larger than 1 to 10 km, and outside the surf zone.

[ http://polar.ncep.noaa.gov/waves/wavewatch/]

Tide Models

This field is experiencing a renaissance due to the necessity of removing tidal signals from satellite altimetry measurements, and many groups are working on improving the models.


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Last modified or updated: May 4, 2004

S. Baum
Dept. of Oceanography
Texas A&M University

baum@stommel.tamu.edu